Infectious Diseases

Pediatric Infectious Diseases

What does a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist do?
What are the career opportunities?
What Board, if any, certifies a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist?
What is the lifestyle of a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist?
What is the compensation of a Pediatric Infectious Disease specialist?
How do I become a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist?
Where do I find out about available programs?
When do I apply?
Why should I choose to become a Pediatric Infectious Diseases specialist?
Faculty Contacts
Proposed Electives

What does a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist do?
Pediatric Infectious Diseases (ID) specialists diagnose, treat, and work to prevent infectious diseases in children. Additionally, they often function like “medical detectives” and evaluate children with symptoms that are recurrent, atypical or unexplained. Pediatric ID physicians combine clinical care with work as researchers, educators, and administrators. Pediatric ID specialists also play key roles in global health, healthcare administration, public policy, and in foundations and other organizations, where they work to improve the health of children in the U.S. and around the world.

A downloadable brochure about a career in Pediatric Infectious Diseases is available by clicking here.

To hear pediatric ID physicians discuss their work, why they chose the field, and why they find it so rewarding, click here.

What are the career opportunities?
Pediatric ID specialists have a variety of career choices. Many in the field follow several paths during their careers, applying their unique combination of training and experience to new and diverse challenges. The career opportunities span multiple areas, including:

Research: Both basic science and clinical trial research expand our knowledge and advance the field, ultimately enhancing the health of infants, children, and adolescents.

Private Practice: Those in private clinical practice focus on patient care, diagnosing and treating a range of infectious diseases in both the outpatient and inpatient settings.

Hospital Epidemiology/Infection Control and Prevention: Identifying, preventing, and controlling infections in healthcare settings are critical in improving the quality of patient care.

Antimicrobial Stewardship: Coordinating strategies to improve the use of antimicrobial medications can enhance patient outcomes, reduce drug resistance, and lower unnecessary costs.

Immunocompromised Host ID: Preventing and managing infectious diseases in transplant recipients is a major component of ensuring successful outcomes for these patients.

Industry: Pharmaceutical companies continue to develop pediatric vaccines and anti-infective agents. Pediatric ID experts play an important role throughout the development and evaluation process.

Public Health: This work includes tracking the epidemiology of infectious diseases, monitoring vaccine preventable diseases, and investigating unusual or emerging pathogens.

Education: Many pediatric ID physicians work at medical schools, children’s hospitals, or community-based teaching hospitals, training the next generation of healthcare providers.

Pediatric ID specialists also play key roles in global health, healthcare administration, public policy, and in foundations and other organizations, where they work to improve the health of children in the U.S. and around the world.

What Board, if any, certifies a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist?
Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialists are certified by the American Board of Pediatrics Sub-board of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. In order to be eligible to take the exam, applicants must first be certified in General Pediatrics. Both exams are administered by the American Board of Pediatrics.

What is the lifestyle of a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist?
The professional life of an academic Pediatric Infectious Diseases specialist combines care of patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings with research, education, and administration. On average, the typical Pediatric ID specialist devotes 50% of his/her time to direct inpatient and outpatient clinical care but this varies according to the interests, expertise and the practice setting of the individual. Call is always taken from home. The flexibility afforded by a career in Pediatric Infectious Diseases makes it possible to balance a busy, stimulating professional life with a satisfying personal life.

What is the compensation of a Pediatric Infectious Disease specialist?
Compensation depends on the type of practice setting, geographic location and time since completion of fellowship. For those who practice in an academic setting, salaries are commensurate with those of other cognitive pediatric subspecialties. Higher salaries are generally associated with industry positions.

How do I become a Pediatric Infectious Diseases subspecialist?
To be certified in pediatric infectious diseases by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP), one must complete a pediatric or medicine/pediatric residency and a 3 year Pediatric ID fellowship in a program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in the United States or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RSPSC), hold a current and valid unrestricted license to practice medicine, and pass the ABP certifying examinations for Pediatrics and for Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Pediatric infectious diseases fellowship training consists of 12 months of clinical training. The remainder of fellowship training is devoted to research and other scholarly activities. To learn more about what it’s like to be a pediatric ID fellow, and for tips about preparing for fellowship, see the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Fellows Survival Guide.

Most pediatric infectious diseases fellowship programs use ERAS for the application process and participate in the NRMP Pediatric Subspecialties Fall Match. Interested applicants should apply for Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellowships in July of their final year of residency. For previous year match statistics, click here.

Where do I find out about available programs?
Detailed information about accredited pediatric infectious disease training programs is listed in the Fellowship Training Programs Directory on the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society website. Information can also be obtained on the ACGME, FREIDA and ERAS websites. Information on fellowship positions that are still available after the NRMP match can be found here.

When do I apply?
Pediatric Infectious Diseases fellowship training programs participate in the NRMP Pediatric Specialties Fall Match. Applicants complete ERAS applications in July of their final year of pediatric or medicine/pediatric residency training. Pediatric Infectious Diseases fellowship programs can begin receiving and reviewing applications in mid-July. Programs typically interview interested applicants from August to October. Important dates concerning the NRMP Pediatric Subspecialties Fall Match can be found here.

Why should I choose to become a Pediatric Infectious Diseases specialist?
Pediatric Infectious Diseases is an exciting, intellectual specialty. It encompasses all systems in the body and a diverse spectra of diseases, pathogens and intensities of illness. The specialty remains constantly challenging due to antimicrobial resistance and threats from new and re-emerging infections. Practice opportunities are available in a variety of settings. Professional endeavors can be balanced with personal goals to provide a satisfying, rewarding future.

A downloadable brochure about a career in Pediatric Infectious Diseases is available by clicking here.

To see a variety of videos in which pediatric ID physicians discuss their work, why they chose the specialty of ID, and why they find pediatric ID so rewarding, click here.

For more information about Pediatric Infectious Diseases, visit these websites:
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
ACGME
FREIDA
ERAS Fellowships
PIDS Fellowship Positions Job Postings
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Fellows Survival Guide
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Career Brochure
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Video Links

Subspecialty Journal:
Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Journal

Faculty Contacts

These individuals have offered to be available to medical students/residents to discuss their particular subspecialty. Questions could include the choice of subspecialty, lifestyle, job opportunities and the fellowship application process. This is not meant to be a long term mentorship relationship.

Kristina Bryant MD
University of Louisville School of Medicine
kristina.bryant@louisville.edu
Research Interests: (Infection Prevention/Control)

Rana El Feghaly MD
University of Mississippi Medical Center
relfeghaly@umc.edu
Research Interests: (Translational studies, Host response to infections (particularly C difficile), infections in cystic fibrosis patients, Quality improvement and error prevention.)

Nada Harik MD
Children’s National Health System/GWU School of Medicine and Health Sciences
nharik@childrensnational.org
Research Interests: (Infection prevention, Bone and joint infections, Quality improvement)

Angela Myers MD, MPH
Children’s Mercy Hospital
amyers@cmh.edu
Research Interests: (HPV vaccine utilization, Outpatient antibiotic stewardship, Educational research)

Jessica N Snowden MD
University of Nebraska Medical Center
jsnowden@unmc.edu
Research Interests: (Neonatal immunity, Infections in the brain, Biofilm infections)

Alison Tribble MD
C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, University of Michigan
tribblea@med.umich,edu
Research Interests: (Implementation of rapid diagnostic platforms, Antimicrobial stewardship strategies such as guideline implementation, Antibiotic use for common pediatric conditions in community hospitals.)

Proposed Electives for a Resident Entering Infectious Diseases
Below is a list of suggested (not mandatory) rotations that a resident should consider if they are planning to apply in this particular subspecialty. This is not meant to be an all-inclusive curriculum, but rather a list to create a program that fits a resident’s individual needs. All applicants should have excellent training in general pediatrics.

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Radiology
  • Orthopedics or other surgical subspecialty rotation
  • Immunology (if available, not an allergy elective)
  • Dermatology (if there is a robust consult service with exposure to dermatologic manifestations of infections and/or adverse drug reactions)
  • Rheumatology
  • Solid organ transplant/Bone marrow transplant
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